Enacting Identity Through Narrative: Interrupting the Procedural Discourse in Mathematics Classrooms by Elizabeth De Freitas (2008)

This is a great paper using a discourse analysis framework from Fairclough (Fairclough, N. (2003). Analysing Discourse: Textual Analysis for social research. New York, NY: Routledge) to divide the speech recorded in some observations from mathematics classes into eight registers: (1) procedural (2) conceptual (3) inquiry questions (4) personal narrative (5) anecdotal (6) metaphoric (7) classroom management (8) school business. The paper focuses largely on the fourth register as a departure from the first.

Janet and Leslie use personal narrative differently in their classroom discourse. Janet uses only one dispassionate and disembodied narrative to impart a moral lesson about socio-economic status and schools, and to entrench an “identity of mastery” in school mathematics. While Leslie presents an embodied presence throughout the procedural discourse, and offers family stories that implicitly contradict the cultural messages of the curriculum. By employing a close textual analysis, I have tried to show how different forms of identity are enacted in these personal narratives, and that these stories often function to enforce the legitimacy of the dominant procedural discourse.

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Elizabeth_Freitas/publication/239931069_ENACTING_IDENTITY_THROUGH_NARRATIVE_INTERRUPTING_THE_PROCEDURAL_DISCOURSE_IN_MATHEMATICS_CLASSROOMS/links/0f31753455e27824f3000000.pdf#page=280

Proceedings of the Fifth International Mathematics Education and Society Conference

João Filipe Matos, Paola Valero and Keiko Yasukawa (Editors) Neuza Pedro and Patricia Perry (Collaborators)

Albufeira, Portugal 16th – 21th February 2008

 

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